Crescent City Collective

 
 
 

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Crescent City Collective

Crescent City Collective

Recapturing images from New Orleans' past

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Crescent City Collective (C3) is pleased to reveal and offer for purchase rare, once in a lifetime, 'attic find' images to discerning lovers of historical New Orleans and South Louisiana culture. The images you will purchase, result from glass lantern negative slides of noted photographer, Eugene Delacroix (1891-1967). These lost slides have been meticulously stored in a custom made, velvet lined oak box under lock and key. Only recently digitized to share with the world.

About Crescent City Collective

Crescent City Collective (C3) is pleased to reveal and offer for purchase rare, once in a lifetime, 'attic find' images to discerning lovers of historical New Orleans and South Louisiana culture. The images you will purchase, result from glass lantern negative slides of noted photographer, Eugene Delacroix (1891-1967). These lost slides have been meticulously stored in a custom made, velvet lined oak box under lock and key. Only recently digitized to share with the world.

Glass Lantern Slides - A lantern slide is a glass transparency that is viewed through a slide projector that casts the image on a wall or other surface. Centuries before the invention of photography, painted images on glass were projected for entertainment. In the 1840s, William and Frederick Langenheim, daguerreotypists in Philadelphia, first used a glass plate negative to print onto another sheet of glass, thus creating a transparent positive image that could be projected. Well into the 20th century, lantern slide projectors displayed photographic images for entertainment as well as education. Lantern slides were not difficult to produce in mass quantities and were therefore easily made available commercially.

Usually a lantern slide was created by placing a dry plate negative directly on light-sensitive glass, which, after it dried, was fitted with a cover glass and mat and sealed with tape. Sometimes a slide was hand-colored with special inks before it was covered. The lantern slide could be viewed through a projector with a light source that changed over time--oil lamp, limelight, carbon arc lamp, and then electric light.

The Collective has painstakingly researched and documented the image portrayed. If a description is missing or broad, not enough visual cues were present to definitively identify the image.

Email: John@crescentcitycollective.com